35 Foods High In Dietary Fiber

Last Updated on September 5, 2022 by Michael Joseph

Dietary fiber can have a range of benefits, and many different foods contain it.

Based on a 2000-calorie diet, the FDA has set a daily value for fiber of 28 grams per day (1).

However, in the United States, data shows that only 5% of men and 9% of women meet this fiber intake recommendation (2).

For those wishing to discover more fiber-rich food options, this article presents a list of foods high in fiber from various food groups.

The source of all nutritional data is the USDA’s FoodData Central Database.

Various Foods That Are High In Dietary Fiber.

1) Almonds

As well as being a source of healthy fats and protein, almonds are a rich source of fiber.

A typical ounce (28.35g) serving provides 3.54 grams of dietary fiber (3).

Per Ounce (28.35g) ServingPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
3.54 g12.5 g2.16 g
Table showing the fiber content of almonds

2) Avocado

Avocado is a nutrient-rich fruit with high fiber content.

An avocado fruit weighing 201 grams offers 13.5 grams of fiber (4).

Per 201-gram FruitPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.5 g6.7 g4.19 g
Table showing the fiber content of avocado

3) Blackberries

Blackberries are a popular summer fruit that offers some good nutritional benefits.

Raw blackberries provide 7.63 grams of fiber per cup (5).

Per 144g CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
7.63 g5.3 g12.33 g
Table showing the fiber content of blackberries

4) Broccoli

Broccoli is a green cruciferous vegetable with high fiber content.

A cup of chopped broccoli (cooked weight) provides 2.37 grams of fiber (6).

Per 78-gram half cupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
2.57 g3.3 g9.43 g
Table showing the fiber content of cooked broccoli

5) Buckwheat

Buckwheat is known as a pseudocereal as, despite being used like a grain, it is a seed.

A cup of roasted buckwheat groats contains approximately 4.54 grams of fiber (7).

Per 168g CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
4.54 g2.7 g2.93 g
Table showing the fiber content of roasted buckwheat groats

6) Cannellini Beans

Of all the different legumes, cannellini beans are one of the most fiber-rich options.

A cup serving of cooked cannellini beans offers 11.3 grams of dietary fiber (8).

Per 180g CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
11.3 g6.3 g4.57 g
Table showing the fiber content of cooked cannellini beans

7) Carob Powder

Carob powder is a nutrient-rich powder often sold as an alternative to cocoa powder due to similar taste characteristics.

Similar to cocoa powder, carob is also a good source of fiber.

One 12-gram tablespoon of carob powder contains 0.96 grams of fiber (9).

Per 12g TablespoonPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.5 g8.0 g2.15 g
Table showing the fiber content of carob powder

8) Chia Seeds

Chia seeds have become popular over recent years due to their nutritional properties.

In addition to being an excellent source of protein, fats, vitamins, and minerals, chia seeds are fiber-rich.

A typical ounce (28.35g) serving of chia seeds provides 9.75 grams of fiber (10).

Per Ounce (28.35g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
9.75 g34.4 g7.08 g
Table showing the fiber content of chia seeds

9) Cocoa Powder

Cocoa powder is a surprisingly rich source of many essential nutrients, particularly copper and magnesium.

It is also an excellent source of fiber, with a tablespoon serving providing 1.85 grams (11).

Per 5-gram tablespoonPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
1.85 g37.0 g16.2 g
Table showing the fiber content of cocoa powder

10) Dates

Dates are a sweet and flavorful stone fruit that is native to tropical regions around the world.

A typical date weighing eight grams offers 0.64 grams of dietary fiber (12).

Per 8-gram FruitPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
0.64 g8.0 g2.84 g
Table showing the fiber content of dates

11) Dried Coconut

Dried coconut meat is a chewy, flavorful food product with a versatile range of uses.

It is also fiber-rich; an ounce (28.35g) serving contains 4.62 grams of dietary fiber (13).

Per ounce (28.35g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
4.62 g16.3 g2.47 g
Table showing the fiber content of dried coconut

12) Eggplant

Eggplant, also known as aubergine, is a versatile vegetable with a spongy texture.

A cup (99g) of cooked eggplant provides 2.48 grams of dietary fiber (14).

Per 99-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
2.48 g2.50 g7.14 g
Table showing the fiber content of eggplant

13) Fava Beans

Fava beans are also known as broad beans, and they are full of essential nutrients.

Among these, the beans offer a good source of fiber; a 170-gram cup serving offers 9.18 grams (15).

Per 170-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
9.18 g5.4 g4.91 g
Table showing the fiber content of fava beans

14) Goji Berries

Despite some exaggerated hype about goji berries being a “superfood,” the berries are a good source of nutrients.

An ounce (28g) serving of goji berries provides 3.64 grams of dietary fiber (16).

Per Ounce (28g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
3.64 g13.0 g3.72 g
Table showing the fiber content of goji berries

15) Gooseberries

Gooseberries are slightly tart berries that have an appearance similar to grapes.

These berries provide 6.45 grams of dietary fiber per 150-gram cup serving (17).

Per 150-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
6.45 g4.30 g9.77 g
Table showing the fiber content of gooseberries

16) Green Peas

Green peas are a starchy vegetable that provides a good range of nutrients, including folate and vitamins C and K.

Peas are an excellent source of dietary fiber; a 160-gram cup of cooked peas offers 7.20 grams (18).

Per 160-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
7.20 g4.50 g5.77 g
Table showing the fiber content of green peas

17) Kale

Like all leafy green vegetables, kale offers a good source of dietary fiber.

A 118-gram cup serving of cooked kale provides 4.72 grams of fiber (19).

Per 118-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
4.72 g4.0 g11.11 g
Table showing the fiber content of kale

18) Kumquat

Unlike most citrus fruit, it is typical for people to eat the edible skin of kumquats.

The skin contains a good amount of fiber, which adds to the total this fruit provides.

A 19-gram kumquat provides 1.24 grams of dietary fiber (20).

Per 19-gram FruitPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
1.24 g6.5 g9.15 g
Table showing the fiber content of kumquat

19) Lentils

Lentils are one of the most popular and versatile types of legumes.

In addition to their protein content and a broad range of vitamins and minerals, lentils are fiber-rich.

A 198-gram cup of cooked lentils typically contains 15.6 grams of fiber (21).

Per 198-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
15.6 g7.9 g6.81 g
Table showing the fiber content of lentils

20) Lima Beans

Lima beans are another fiber-rich legume.

A 188-gram cup serving of cooked lima beans provides 13.2 grams of fiber (22).

Per 188-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.5 g7.0 g6.09 g
Table showing the fiber content of lima beans

21) Lupin Beans

Lupin beans are native to the Mediterranean region and may not be as well known as other legumes in some countries.

These beans are a good source of fiber, and they offer 4.65 grams per 166-gram cup (23).

Per 166-gram FruitPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
4.65 g2.8 g2.35 g
Table showing the fiber content of lupin beans

22) Mung Beans

Mung beans are small green beans that belong to the legume family of plants.

The beans are very high in dietary fiber, with a 185-gram cup serving providing 13.1 grams (24).

Per 185-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.1 g7.1 g4.58 g
Table showing the fiber content of mung beans

23) Oats

Oats are one of the most popular breakfast foods and offer a wide range of nutrients.

By dry weight, half a cup (40.5g) of oats provides 4.09 grams of fiber (25).

Per 1/2 cup (40g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
4.09 g10.1 g2.66 g
Table showing the fiber content of oats

24) Pearled Barley

Pearled barley is a form of barley that is polished after its outer hull is removed.

It is a grain that is rich in fiber and overall nutrients.

A 157-gram cup of cooked pearled barley supplies 5.97 grams of dietary fiber (26).

Per 157-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
5.97 g3.8 g3.09 g
Table showing the fiber content of pearled barley

25) Raspberries

Raspberries are a delicious summer fruit. Despite their high water content and juiciness, they are also fiber-rich.

For example, a 123-gram cup of raw raspberries provides 8.0 grams dietary fiber (27).

Per 123-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
8.0 g6.5 g12.5 g
Table showing the fiber content of raspberries

26) Red Kidney Beans

Red kidney beans are one of the most common legumes in typical diets.

Like other legumes, they are rich in fiber. For example, a 177-gram cup serving of cooked red kidney beans offers 13.1 grams of fiber (28).

Per 177-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.1 g7.4 g5.83 g
Table showing the fiber content of red kidney beans

27) Roasted Chestnuts

Roasted chestnuts are a popular snack, particularly on a cold winter’s day.

A 143-gram cup of roasted chestnuts offers 7.29 grams dietary fiber (29).

Per 143-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.5 g5.1 g2.08 g
Table showing the fiber content of roasted chestnuts

28) Rye Flour

The fiber content of different flours can vary significantly.

One of the most fiber-rich choices is dark rye flour, which offers 30.5 grams of fiber per 128-gram cup (30).

Per 128-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
30.5 g23.8 g7.32 g
Table showing the fiber content of rye flour

29) Sesame Seeds

In addition to their taste-enhancing properties, sesame seeds are a good source of fatty acids, protein, and fiber.

The fiber content of toasted sesame seeds is 3.97 grams per ounce (28.35g) serving (31).

Per Ounce (28.35g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
3.97 g14.0 g2.48 g
Table showing the fiber content of sesame seeds

30) Split Peas

Just as regular green peas are high in fiber, so are (dried) green split peas.

Per 196-gram cup serving, cooked split peas offer 16.3 grams of fiber (32).

Per 196-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
16.3 g8.34 g7.07 g
Table showing the fiber content of split green peas

31) Sunflower Seeds

Most seeds offer a good provision of fiber, and sunflower seeds are another excellent option.

An ounce (28.35g) serving of sunflower seeds provides 3.15 grams of fiber (33).

Per Ounce (28.35g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
3.15 g11.1 g1.91 g
Table showing the fiber content of sunflower seeds

32) Sweet Potatoes

The fiber content of sweet potatoes depends on whether the skin is consumed.

Although peeled sweet potatoes still provide fiber, consuming the skin offers more.

A large (180-gram) sweet potato baked in its skin provides 5.94 grams of dietary fiber (34).

Per Large (180g) Sweet PotatoPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
5.94 g3.3 g3.67 g
Table showing the fiber content of sweet potatoes

33) Wheat Bran

Wheat bran is the outer layer of the whole grain wheat kernel and is a rich fiber source.

Just an eight-gram serving of wheat bran offers 3.42 grams of fiber (35).

Per 8-gram ServingPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
13.5 g42.8 g19.81 g
Table showing the fiber content of wheat bran

34) Whole Wheat Bread

Choosing whole wheat bread over more processed options can be a simple way to increase fiber intake.

A slice of commercially prepared whole wheat bread provides 1.93 grams of fiber (36).

Per Slice (32.1g)Per 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
1.93 g6.0 g2.36 g
Table showing the fiber content of whole wheat bread

35) Whole Wheat Pasta

Whole wheat pasta is another way of eating whole grain wheat.

A 140-gram cup of cooked whole grain pasta offers 5.46 grams fiber (37).

Per 140-gram CupPer 100 GramsPer 100 Calories
5.46 g3.9 g2.64 g
Table showing the fiber content of whole wheat pasta

At-a-Glance Comparison of Foods High In Fiber

The following table shows a ranking of fiber-rich foods by their fiber content per 100 grams.

Since the total energy content of food is also important, the table shows the calorie content for each 100-gram portion.

RankFood Fiber Per 100gCalories Per 100g
1Wheat bran42.8 g216 kcal
2Cocoa powder37.0 g228 kcal
3Chia seeds34.4 g486 kcal
4Rye flour (dry weight)23.8 g325 kcal
5Dried coconut16.3 g660 kcal
6Sesame seeds14.0 g565 kcal
7Goji berries (dried)13.0 g349 kcal
8Almonds12.5 g579 kcal
9Sunflower seeds11.1 g582 kcal
10Oats (dry weight)10.1 g379 kcal
11Split peas (cooked)8.34 g118 kcal
12Carob powder8.0 g372 kcal
13Dates8.0 g282 kcal
14Lentils (cooked)7.9 g116 kcal
15Red kidney beans (cooked)7.4 g127 kcal
16Mung beans (cooked)7.1 g155 kcal
17Lima beans (cooked)7.0 g115 kcal
18Avocado6.7 g160 kcal
19Kumquat6.5 g71 kcal
20Raspberries6.5 g52 kcal
21Cannellini beans (cooked)6.3 g138 kcal
22Whole wheat bread6.0 g254 kcal
23Fava beans (cooked)5.4 g147 kcal
24Blackberries5.3 g43 kcal
25Roasted chestnuts5.1 g245 kcal
26Green peas (cooked)4.50 g78 kcal
27Gooseberries4.30 g44 kcal
28Kale (cooked)4.0 g36 kcal
29Whole wheat pasta (cooked)3.9 g148 kcal
30Pearled barley (cooked)3.8 g123 kcal
31Broccoli (cooked)3.3 g35 kcal
32Sweet potatoes (cooked)3.3 g90 kcal
33Lupin beans (cooked)2.8 g119 kcal
34Buckwheat (cooked)2.7 g92 kcal
35Eggplant (cooked)2.5035 kcal
Table showing a ranking of fiber-rich foods by their fiber content per 100 grams

Final Thoughts

People can sometimes find it challenging to get enough dietary fiber.

However, this article shows that a broad range of fiber-rich foods is available, covering multiple food groups.

Including several of these foods daily is a simple way to increase fiber intake.

2 thoughts on “35 Foods High In Dietary Fiber”

  1. Good info and I take it as reasonably accurate. I see no mention how cooking may alter the fibre content if at all. Thanks for putting up this info.

    Reply
    • Thanks Otto. Cooking food can partially break down the cell walls of foods – particularly if processed in some way (e.g. mashing). On the plus side, this process also makes several nutrients in the food more bioavailable. However, most of the fiber content of the food will still be present regardless. In addition, the fiber amounts presented in the article are for cooked weight where applicable.

      Reply

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