12 Types of Meat and Their Benefits (Includes Full Nutrition Facts)

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Picture Showing Different Cuts and Types of Meat.There are many different types of meat, and all have been part of the human diet for thousands of years.

Generally speaking, meat offers excellent nutritional value and provides a good range of essential nutrients.

This article reviews the nutritional profile, potential benefits, and concerns of twelve common varieties of meat.

1. Pork

Picture of Pork - Most Popular Types of Meat.

Pork is one of the most popular forms of meat in the world.

Despite some confusion on the issue, pork is classed as red meat. This is because it contains a large amount of myoglobin, a protein responsible for the red color of meat.

In fact, there are so many different cuts of pork, and a variety of meat products use it such as;

Nutrition Facts

Based on data provided by the USDA FoodCentral Database, here is the typical nutritional profile for ground pork meat per 100g (1).

(Note: Different cuts of meat will vary in their nutrient content, but this provides a general idea of each meat, and the cuts are as close a match as possible.)

Nutrient Amount 
Calories263 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein16.9 g
Fat21 g
   – Saturated7.9 g
   – Monounsaturated9.4 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.9 g
        – Omega-370 mg
        – Omega-61670 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio23.8 : 1
Vitamin A0
Vitamin C1% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Thiamin49% DV
Riboflavin14% DV
Niacin22% DV
Vitamin B619% DV
Folate1% DV
Vitamin B1212% DV
Pantothenic Acid7% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron5% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus18% DV
Potassium8% DV
Sodium2% DV
Zinc15% DV
Copper2% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium35% DV

Benefits

  • Pork is a particularly significant source of thiamin (vitamin B1). The content of this important vitamin is much higher than in other meat and plays an essential role in glucose metabolism and protecting cardiac health (2, 3).
  • Much cheaper than most other meats.
  • Pork contains decent amounts of selenium and zinc, which are responsible for boosting the immune system, defending against oxidative stress, and optimal hormone production (4, 5).

Concerns

  • Pork is more susceptible to bacterial contamination and food-borne illnesses than other meat; ensuring pork is thoroughly cooked is essential (6, 7).

2. Beef

Picture of Beef - Common Types of Meat

When most people think of red meat, they probably imagine beef.

There are many different beef products and cuts of beef, ranging from hamburgers to rib eye steaks.

Nutrition Facts

Here are the nutrient values for ground beef per 100 grams (8).

Nutrient Amount 
Calories254 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein17.2 g
Fat20 g
   – Saturated7.7 g
   – Monounsaturated8.8 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.5 g
        – Omega-348 mg
        – Omega-6435 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio9 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E2%
Vitamin K2%
Thiamin3% DV
Riboflavin9% DV
Niacin21% DV
Vitamin B616% DV
Folate2% DV
Vitamin B1236% DV
Pantothenic Acid5% DV
Calcium2% DV
Iron11% DV
Magnesium4% DV
Phosphorus16% DV
Potassium8% DV
Sodium3% DV
Zinc28% DV
Copper3% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium21% DV

It is also important to note that the nutritional properties of beef can vary considerably depending on the fat content.

For example, a ribeye steak will be much higher in fat (and calories) than a lean cut of meat.

To gain a better idea of how different cuts of beef compare, see this guide to steak varieties and their nutrient profiles.

Benefits

  • Beef contributes large amounts of iron, zinc, and vitamin B12 to the average person’s diet (9).
  • Interestingly, the main fatty acid in beef is none other than oleic acid. If you haven’t heard of it before, then it’s also the main fat in olive oil (and known as “heart healthy”) (10, 11).
  • Beef contains a wide variety of potentially beneficial compounds that include creatine, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and glutathione (12, 13, 14).

Concerns

  • Excessive beef consumption can increase circulating iron to unhealthy levels in some individuals. These high levels can increase the risk of various cancers and cardiovascular disease. This risk is especially the case in those with a genetic mutation called hemochromatosis, which causes over-absorption of heme iron (15, 16).
  • Overcooking beef (burning) can lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic amines (HCAs). Both of these compounds are carcinogens, but we can minimize their risks by sensibly cooking meat (17, 18).

See this full guide to beef’s benefits for more information.

3. Lamb and Mutton

Picture of Lamb Chops Ready For Cooking.

Both lamb and mutton are very similar types of meat, with one fundamental difference;

  • Lamb is from a sheep less than one-year-old
  • Mutton is the meat of an adult sheep

Just like beef and pork, there are a variety of popular lamb cuts — perhaps lamb chops are the most popular.

Nutrition Facts

Per 100g, the nutritional profile of ground lamb meat looks something like this (19);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories282 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein16.6 g
Fat23.4 g
   – Saturated10.2 g
   – Monounsaturated9.6 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.9 g
        – Omega-3420 mg
        – Omega-61360 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio3.2 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E1% DV
Vitamin K4% DV
Thiamin7% DV
Riboflavin12% DV
Niacin30% DV
Vitamin B66% DV
Folate5% DV
Vitamin B1239% DV
Pantothenic Acid7% DV
Calcium2% DV
Iron9% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus16% DV
Potassium6% DV
Sodium2% DV
Zinc23% DV
Copper5% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium27% DV

Benefits

Generally speaking, both lamb and mutton are nutritious meat options.

  • Because sheep graze on pasture all day, the omega 6 to 3 ratio is very low—and perhaps optimal—compared to other meats (20).
  • Lamb contains a broad range of health-protective nutrients, especially zinc, selenium and B vitamins.

Concerns

  • Lamb is very expensive in comparison to other kinds of meat.

4. Chicken

Picture of Chicken.

Alongside beef and pork, chicken is one of the ‘big three’ popularity-wise.

However, chicken is a different classification of meat and comes under the poultry category.

People commonly refer to poultry as ‘white meat’.

As one of the most popular foods in the world, there are all sorts of chicken-based foods. These range from fried and roasted chicken to chicken soup and even chicken popcorn.

Nutrition Facts

Ground chicken meat provides the following nutrients per 100g (21);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories143 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein17.4 g
Fat8.1 g
   – Saturated2.3 g
   – Monounsaturated3.6 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.5 g
        – Omega-396 mg
        – Omega-61327 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio13.8 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E1% DV
Vitamin K1% DV
Thiamin7% DV
Riboflavin14% DV
Niacin22% DV
Vitamin B619% DV
Folate1% DV
Vitamin B1214% DV
Pantothenic Acid11% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron5% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus18% DV
Potassium15% DV
Sodium3% DV
Zinc10% DV
Copper3% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium15% DV

Benefits

  • Chicken is very cheap and affordable.
  • For those who are trying to consume less fat/calories, chicken offers a smaller amount than other meats but with the same protein content. In other words, chicken is protein-dense.
  • Chicken stock/broth offers a significant source of gelatin. As chicken bones have a lower density than other meats, the collagen and gelatin are far easier to extract.
  • Chicken provides a decent source of necessary vitamins and minerals, particularly selenium, potassium, phosphorus and B vitamins.

Concerns

  • Unfortunately, bacterial contamination with strains such as E. coli and salmonella isn’t rare with chicken. As a result, strict hygiene procedures are necessary when handling raw meat (22, 23).

See this guide to the nutrition profile and potential benefits of chicken for more information.

5. Turkey

Picture of Roast Turkey - a Christmas Favorite.

Turkey is another type of white meat, probably best known for its appearance at the Christmas table.

It has both a deeper yet drier taste than chicken and is a less prevalent form of poultry.

As mentioned above, the most popular kind is probably roast turkey, but you can find a variety of processed and unprocessed turkey products.

Nutrition Facts

Turkey’s nutritional composition is very similar to chicken and looks like this (24);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories149 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein17.5 g
Fat8.3 g
   – Saturated2.3 g
   – Monounsaturated3.1 g
   – Polyunsaturated2.0 g
        – Omega-3110 mg
        – Omega-61800 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio16.3 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E2% DV
Vitamin K1% DV
Thiamin4% DV
Riboflavin8% DV
Niacin17% DV
Vitamin B618% DV
Folate2% DV
Vitamin B126% DV
Pantothenic Acid7% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron7% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus16% DV
Potassium7% DV
Sodium4% DV
Zinc13% DV
Copper4% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium27% DV

Benefits

  • Turkey is among the most protein-dense of all meats, offering 17.5 grams of protein for only 149 calories.
  • Similar to chicken, turkey also provides a significant amount of B vitamins, potassium, selenium and phosphorus.
  • Turkey provides an inexpensive source of high-quality protein.

Concerns

  • Similar to other forms of poultry, turkey is more likely to harbor foodborne bacteria than red meat (25).

6. Venison

Picture of Venison Meat - a Meat Growing in Popularity.

Venison refers to the flesh of a deer, and it is a traditionally rarer type of meat.

In recent years, sales of venison have been soaring as a result of its perceived healthy reputation among consumers.

But is that reputation justified?

Nutrition Facts

Despite being a red meat, venison is very lean. In terms of nutrition, it looks more like white meat.

Here are the nutritional details per 100g of ground venison (26);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories157 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein21.8 g
Fat7.1 g
   – Saturated3.4 g
   – Monounsaturated1.3 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.4 g
        – Omega-3104 mg
        – Omega-6225 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio2 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E2% DV
Vitamin K1% DV
Thiamin36% DV
Riboflavin17% DV
Niacin28% DV
Vitamin B623% DV
Folate1% DV
Vitamin B1231% DV
Pantothenic Acid7% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron16% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus20% DV
Potassium9% DV
Sodium3% DV
Zinc28% DV
Copper7% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium14% DV

Benefits

  • As deer mostly live and feed in the wild, venison has a much lower fat (and omega-6 to omega-3 ratio) than other meat. The excellent omega 6 to 3 ratio stands at approximately 2:1.
  • Venison has more vitamins and minerals than beef despite having significantly fewer calories. In short, venison is possibly the most nutrient-dense meat out there.

Concerns

  • One obstacle could be the price; venison costs a lot. Expect to pay around $30 for one pound of venison steak.
  • Source is extremely important. In some areas, deer can be infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD). See this full guide to venison meat for more information.

7. Duck

Picture of a Cooked Duck Dish.

Duck is one of the less popular types of meat.

However, it has immense popularity in Chinese populations, where ‘Peking duck’ is a showpiece dish.

Like chicken and turkey, we can consider duck as a kind of white meat.

Nutrition Facts

Typical duck meat provides the following nutrients (27);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories132 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein18.3 g
Fat5.9 g
   – Saturated2.3 g
   – Monounsaturated1.5 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.7 g
        – Omega-380 mg
        – Omega-6670 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio8.4 : 1
Vitamin A2% DV
Vitamin C10% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E4% DV
Vitamin K3% DV
Thiamin24% DV
Riboflavin0.5% DV
Niacin5.3% DV
Vitamin B617% DV
Folate6% DV
Vitamin B127% DV
Pantothenic Acid16% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron13% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus20% DV
Potassium8% DV
Sodium3% DV
Zinc13% DV
Copper13% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium20% DV

Benefits

  • Duck provides a significant amount of selenium, phosphorus, and B vitamins. These vitamins are all important for optimal energy production and a well-functioning immune system (28, 29).

Concerns

  • Making duck at home—or having a roast duck—is perfectly healthy. However, be aware that in Chinese cuisine, duck often comes in sauces made from a variety of additives including sugars and oils.

8. Wild Boar

Picture of Wild Boar Meat.

Wild boar is a non-domesticated pig that lives in the wild.

The meat of this animal is also known as ‘wild boar.’

Generally speaking, wild boar contains a higher proportion of protein and a smaller amount of fat than regular pork.

Nutrition Facts

Wild boar has very different nutritional values from domestic pork, and per 100 g it looks like this (30);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories160 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein28.3 g
Fat4.4 g
   – Saturated1.3 g
   – Monounsaturated1.7 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.6 g
        – Omega-330 mg
        – Omega-6500 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio16.7 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K2% DV
Thiamin21% DV
Riboflavin8% DV
Niacin21% DV
Vitamin B621% DV
Folate1% DV
Vitamin B1212% DV
Pantothenic Acid0% DV
Calcium2% DV
Iron6% DV
Magnesium7% DV
Phosphorus13% DV
Potassium11% DV
Sodium3% DV
Zinc20% DV
Copper3% DV
Manganese0% DV
Selenium19% DV

Benefits

  • As it lives and feeds in its natural environment, wild boar contains a higher proportion of omega-3 fatty acids than purely grain-fed pigs.
  • Wild boar contains an array of health-protective nutrients, in particularly B vitamins, selenium, and zinc.

Concerns

  • Trichinella spiralis, a parasite sometimes found in pigs, occasionally contaminates wild boar meat. There have been several outbreaks of this in recent years, but it is quite rare (31, 32, 33).

9. Bison

Buffalo Farm's Fresh Bison Logo.

Bison is a type of red meat that is nutritious and very lean.

For this reason, it is an excellent choice of meat for anyone looking to keep their fat or calorie intake a little lower.

Nutrition Facts

Bison is quite nutrient-dense and offers the following nutrition profile per 100 grams (34);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories146 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein20.2 g
Fat7.2 g
   – Saturated2.9 g
   – Monounsaturated2.8 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.3 g
        – Omega-338 mg
        – Omega-6261 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio6.9 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E1% DV
Vitamin K1% DV
Thiamin9% DV
Riboflavin14% DV
Niacin27% DV
Vitamin B619% DV
Folate3% DV
Vitamin B1232% DV
Pantothenic Acid0% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron15% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus19% DV
Potassium9% DV
Sodium3% DV
Zinc31% DV
Copper7% DV
Manganese0% DV
Selenium29% DV

Benefits

  • Although the above data is for conventionally raised animals, grass-fed bison can be very high in omega-3.
  • Bison offers a wide range of nutrients for very few calories.

See this full nutrition review of bison meat for further information.

Concerns

  • Bison is very expensive compared to other types of red meat, making it unaffordable for some people.

10. Goose

Roast Goose Meat.

Goose is a type of poultry that comes under the ‘white meat’ banner, and it is particularly popular throughout China, Europe, and the Middle East.

Nutrition Facts

Goose meat offers good nutritional value, and it provides the following nutrients per 100 grams (35);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories161 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein22.8 g
Fat7.1 g
   – Saturated2.8 g
   – Monounsaturated1.9 g
   – Polyunsaturated0.9 g
        – Omega-3100 mg
        – Omega-6800 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio8 : 1
Vitamin A1% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Thiamin9% DV
Riboflavin22% DV
Niacin21% DV
Vitamin B632% DV
Folate8% DV
Vitamin B128% DV
Pantothenic Acid20% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron14% DV
Magnesium6% DV
Phosphorus31% DV
Potassium12% DV
Sodium4% DV
Zinc16% DV
Copper15% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium24% DV

Benefits

  • Goose meat is a rich source of many nutrients, and it is particularly high in vitamin B6, phosphorus, and selenium.
  • Similar to other poultry options, goose meat (without skin) is very protein-dense.

Concerns

  • Depending on location, it can be difficult to find goose meat for sale.
  • Sometimes wild geese can be susceptible to infections which can be transmittable to humans (by touch). However, this should not be an issue with goose meat bought from a store. Also, like with other poultry, cooking will kill any bacteria present (36).

See this full guide to goose meat for an in-depth look at its nutrition properties.

11. Rabbit

Rabbit Meat Cooked In Red Wine.

Although the idea of rabbit as food can seem strange, it is a common type of meat in some parts of Europe and the United States (and China).

Rabbit is very popular in France where it is considered to be a delicacy.

Nutrition Facts

Rabbit meat is surprisingly nutrient-dense, and it offers the following nutrition profile per 100 grams (37);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories136 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein20.0 g
Fat5.5 g
   – Saturated1.7 g
   – Monounsaturated1.5 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.1 g
        – Omega-3220 mg
        – Omega-6860 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio3.9 : 1
Vitamin A0% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Thiamin7% DV
Riboflavin9% DV
Niacin36% DV
Vitamin B625% DV
Folate2% DV
Vitamin B12119% DV
Pantothenic Acid8% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron9% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus21% DV
Potassium9% DV
Sodium2% DV
Zinc7% DV
Copper7% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium34% DV

Benefits

  • Rabbit is a substantial source of vitamin B12 and it is also very high in selenium.
  • Although it is not as high in protein as some kinds of meat, rabbit is very low in fat and calories. As a result, it is very protein-dense; 20 grams of protein per 136 calories.
  • Rabbit offers one of the better omega-6 to 3 ratios among meat.

Concerns

  • Wild rabbits are occasionally infected with a pathogen known as tularemia. It is possible for undercooked rabbit meat to transmit this infection (38).

12. Pheasant

Roast Pheasant Meat On a Plate.

Pheasant is thought to be a ‘premium’ meat product thanks to its flavorful taste, and the meat is popular across Europe and the United States.

Nutrition Facts

Pheasant offers an impressive nutrition profile, and it contains the following nutrients per 100 grams (39);

Nutrient Amount 
Calories181 kcal
Carbohydrate0 g
Protein22.7 g
Fat9.3 g
   – Saturated2.7 g
   – Monounsaturated4.3 g
   – Polyunsaturated1.2 g
        – Omega-3100 mg
        – Omega-6810 mg
Omega 6 to 3 Ratio8 : 1
Vitamin A4% DV
Vitamin C0% DV
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Thiamin5% DV
Riboflavin8% DV
Niacin32% DV
Vitamin B633% DV
Folate1% DV
Vitamin B1213% DV
Pantothenic Acid9% DV
Calcium1% DV
Iron6% DV
Magnesium5% DV
Phosphorus21% DV
Potassium7% DV
Sodium2% DV
Zinc6% DV
Copper3% DV
Manganese1% DV
Selenium22% DV

Benefits

  • Pheasant is an excellent source of B vitamins, and it is particularly high in these nutritions compared to other varieties of poultry.
  • Pheasant need space and they are usually wild or from ‘free range’ farms where they have access to pasture.

Concerns

  • There are no specific concerns about pheasant meat. However, like all poultry, it should be cooked fully to minimize the risk of food poisoning.

Omega-6 to Omega-3 Ratio By Variety of Meat

One of the biggest ‘health trends’ over the past decade is the focus on naturally raised, grass-fed beef and pastured animal products.

Animal welfare is one of the often mentioned reasons for this. However, many people have also taken an interest in the better 6 to 3 ratio of the meat.

The main reason for this seems to be because most of us are consuming excessive amounts of omega-6 in recent times.

For example, the traditional human diet was believed to have a ratio of close to 1:1 omega-6 to omega-3. However, modern-day estimates place this ratio up to a high of 25:1 (40).

For easy reference, here are the approximate omega-6 to 3 ratios for the meats in this article;

Type of MeatOmega-6 to Omega-3 Ratio
Beef9 : 1
Chicken13.8 : 1
Duck8.4 : 1
Lamb and Mutton3.2 : 1
Pork23.8 : 1
Turkey16.3 : 1
Venison2 : 1
Wild Boar16.7 : 1
Bison6.9 : 1
Goose8 : 1
Rabbit3.9 : 1
Pheasant8 : 1

Please note: to ensure balance, this data is for conventional meats, and you can expect a better ratio for fully grass-fed meat.

The fatty acid ratios of meat will also vary depending on what producers feed the animals.

Which Type of Meat is Healthiest?

Picture of a Girl Holding Some Meat in the Air.

To be honest, there is no single meat that is outright ‘healthier’ than another.

There are a variety of factors to consider which include the nutrient profile, taste, and affordability.

However, it is often a good idea to mix and match food choices, which can help to attain a greater range of nutrients.

Organ Meat

Organ meats are among the most nutrient-dense of all foods.

Although they are not as popular as they once were, foods like beef liver and kidneys are full of essential nutrients.

See this guide to organ meats for further information.

Cured Meat

While cured meats do not have as good a health reputation as fresh meat, the dangers are often overplayed.

This guide to cured meats discusses the most popular options.

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Tom
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Tom

Wow, what a great article. I’ve been looking for an article like this one without bias & using science to back it up. I like that you did your homework and that you see the pros & cons in everything.
Thanks

Ashlie
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Ashlie

Thank you very much! This is a very helpful content in my Cookery class. I hope the team can also include “chevon” – goat meat.

Lasantha
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Lasantha

We in Sri Lanka call the flesh of the Goat as Mutton and of Sheep as Lamb. Even in India Mutton means the flesh of goat. I think this is the usage in Asia.

Goddet
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Goddet

Meat is good for people but excessive amount is not good. Pork make one fat very quickly

Lucy
Guest

Interesting! But you haven’t differentiated between grass-fed or free-range! Aberdeen Angus grass-fed beef for instance has a very different profile to mass produced US beef! Same with chickens free-range compared to mass produced caged?

Paul James Wilson
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Paul James Wilson

Great information. Interested to know how Ostrich meat compares.

yanuario arias
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yanuario arias

I started eating only meats and was wondering of the nutritional values this is perfect. i’m going to eat an lot of beef, seafoods, some chicken, pork but lamb wasn’t high on my list now its going to be second on it. it would have been great to see the values of chicken hearts liver and gizzards, beef liver as well.

Michelle Pacheco
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Michelle Pacheco

Great article i just learn something new. Thank you.

Yaritsa
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Yaritsa

This is a great article! I had a gastric bypass done 9 months ago, and I only eat red meat once a month. I only have about 3-4 ounces of meat. I have B12 and iron deficiency and it really helps my body. I never fry it. I always boil it and then sauté it with veggies.

dr.jayveer sinsh
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dr.jayveer sinsh

great article it was.

can i know the source of nutritional information.?

Algy Goosen
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Algy Goosen

Thank you for that breakdown Michael – it’s great! We don’t get wild board where we live (Vancouver Island, BC, Canada), but we do get Bison (buffalo). We’re very fortunate that our local Farmers Market supply all of the rest, and at very reasonable prices. When we visited Australia we ate a lot of lamb, simply because over there it’s really one of the cheapest meats. Would be nice if you could to a similar thing for common fish. On the West Coast of Canada we get lots of wild Salmon (Sockeye, Coho, Pink etc.) – very different from farmed… Read more »

Glenn
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Glenn

You failed to mention rabbit!

Ankit Prajapati
Guest

Great Article…..
Helped me to understand the basics and types of Meat…..
I was always so confused between Bacon and Ham and Steak…..
Now I got the proper Classification….
Thanks for the Info…..

Sam
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Sam

What a good presentation. I will be using this as basis for my report in class. Thank you.

Rvdh
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Rvdh

Why if fish not considered a meat type? What makes it different?

Carole
Guest

What an outstanding article! I had no idea that pork had such an astronomical Omega 6: 3 ratio. Too bad it’s my favorite meat. I guess I’ll have to start eating more lamb and beef. Thank you so much for this valuable information.